About Lori

Canadian author Lori Wolf-Heffner sitting on a rock
Photo by Erin Watts Photography

Lori Wolf-Heffner is the author of the young adult series Between Worlds and the creative non-fiction  memoir Postcards in a Closet. She was an inaugural member of the Canadian National Tap Team, wrote and submitted a Star Trek novel in her teens (it was rejected—she needed an agent), and spent one day twice in Luxembourg and 15 minutes once in Switzerland. She can still do cartwheels.

Lori was a child of the 80s, the age of girl power on energy drinks and steroids. The 90s for Lori were a rollercoaster ride: high school, national and international dance competitions, the dream of becoming a writer, and the challenges that come with growing up and moving out.

Over six years, from 1998-2004, Lori alternated between living in Germany and Canada. She then settled down and had a family. In 2008, she wrote her first freelance articles, for Dance Canada Quarterly.

Lori understood the challenges of becoming and being a woman. However, a mom of two sons, she had to learn about the challenges of becoming a man. While these thoughts circulated in her head, Lori built her freelance business, expanding her clientele to magazines such as just dance! and The Dance Current and companies in several industries, including tech, translation, and the performing arts.

In 2015, CSARN accepted Lori into their one-year mentorship program, and she hasn’t looked back since. (CSARN is the Canadian Senior Artists’ Resource Network.) Mentored by Carol McQuaig, Lori wrote the first version of Postcards in a Closet, a creative non-fiction memoir about a great-grandmother who was a single mom-to-be in the aftermath of World War I. At first printed only for family, Lori published it later for the public.

Cover for "Between Worlds 1: The Move" by Canadian author Lori Wolf-Heffner
Cover design by Michelle Fairbanks of Fresh Design

Inspired by her great-grandmother’s story, Lori wrote and published Between Worlds 1: The Move in 2018. In this series, girls strive to grow up according to their dreams. Whether Juliana today is still trying to discover her life’s goals or Elisabeth in 1920 dreams of fulfilling her community’s expectations of her, it’s up to them to decide what paths they want to follow.

The men? They play an important part in these two girls’ lives, too: Georg (Elisabeth’s cousin) and Stefan (Georg’s friend) are veterans of World War I trying to cope in a society that expects all men to provide for their family—without fail. Paul, Juliana’s dad, tries to find that balance between loving his career as a truck driver and wanting to be home with his daughter. Then there’s Opa, Juliana’s grandfather, a proud man who places family above all else but who is losing his independence to dementia.

Lori has her Honours BA in German with a second general major in Psychology from Wilfrid Laurier University, and her MA in German from the University of Waterloo. She lives in Waterloo with her husband and two sons and still occasionally does a cartwheel.

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